133
133
Cartier, Paris
MINIATURE DESK CLOCK
Estimate
10,00015,000
LOT SOLD. 21,250 GBP
JUMP TO LOT
133
Cartier, Paris
MINIATURE DESK CLOCK
Estimate
10,00015,000
LOT SOLD. 21,250 GBP
JUMP TO LOT

Details & Cataloguing

Daughter of History: Mary Soames and the Legacy of Churchill

|
London

Cartier, Paris
MINIATURE DESK CLOCK
the circular dial applied with black Arabic numerals and millegrain set rose diamond hands, to rectangular pink guilloché enamel case and carved agate foot, case measuring approximately 55 x 42 x 37mm, dial signed Cartier, with winding key, fitted case stamped Cartier Paris
silver, enamel, agate, diamonds
approximate height 22cm., 3¼in.
Established 1847
Made circa 1910.
Read Condition Report Read Condition Report

Literature

Cf: Jader Barracca, Giampiero Negretti and Franco Nencini, Le Temps de Cartier, Milan, 1989, pp.40-41, 58-59 and 108 for examples of similar desk clocks by Cartier.

Catalogue Note

An iconic piece of Cartier’s early 20th century design, this clock with its rich, opalescent enamel work represents the firm’s drive at the height of the Belle Époque to produce pieces, particularly objects and vertu, to compete with the workshops of Moscow and St. Petersburg. Objects in the revived Louis XVI style and the associated technique of fine ‘guilloché’ enamelling, in which layers of translucent enamel are applied to an intricately worked metal surface, had been most famously perfected by Fabergé earlier. In what might be considered an attempt to re-appropriate an originally French style, Cartier began by employing the Yahr workshops in Moscow, but soon found Parisians capable of undertaking this highly skilled work. This recreation of the Fabergé style reached its peak in 1908, when Cartier presented Tsar Nicholas the II with a gem set and enamel clock in the shape of an Easter egg. Cartier’s table clocks, in similar fashion, were to become widely popular as gifts, particularly in Edwardian England where they found favour with figures such as Princess Zenaïde Yousssopov and Edward VII himself. The dating of comparable pieces, including a desk set presented at the recent exhibition, ‘Cartier: Le style et l’histoire’, at the Grand Palais in Paris (Cat. No. 90), suggests that this clock is likely to have been produced around the time of Winston and Clementine's marriage and may have been a generous gift to the couple.

Daughter of History: Mary Soames and the Legacy of Churchill

|
London