56
56
Kahlo, Frida
CORRESPONDENCE WITH DIEGO RIVERA. 1940'S - 1953
Estimate
80,000120,000
LOT SOLD. 100,000 USD
JUMP TO LOT
56
Kahlo, Frida
CORRESPONDENCE WITH DIEGO RIVERA. 1940'S - 1953
Estimate
80,000120,000
LOT SOLD. 100,000 USD
JUMP TO LOT

Details & Cataloguing

Fine Books & Manuscripts, Including Americana

|
New York

Kahlo, Frida
CORRESPONDENCE WITH DIEGO RIVERA. 1940'S - 1953
19 autograph letters and notes, in Spanish, mostly signed "Frida" or "Fisita," 27 pages (varying sizes), in Mexico and New York, with envelopes, including one with a Chinese Yin Yang symbol, 4 telegrams, to Diego Rivera. 
With: Certificate of Marriage for Frida Kahlo and Diego Rivera, State of California, San Francisco, 11 August 1949; with autograph list of American popular songs and Mexican folk songs; with autograph list of twelve Mexican festivals written on the back of an envelope. 
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Provenance

Gift from Ruth Rivera Marin to the family of the present owner, Consuelo Eckhardt Taracena.

Literature

The Diary of Frida Kahlo: An Intimate Self-Portrait, with an introduction by Carlos Fuentes, 1995; Hayden Herrera, Frida: A Biography of Frida Kahlo, 1983; Frida Kahlo: The Paintings, 1992; Frida Kahlo: Sus Photos, 2010; Frida Kahlo, the unknown Frida, the woman behind the work: an unedited, private collection of letters from Frida Kahlo to Diego Rivera, and other documents. October 12-November 9, 1991, Louis Newman Galleries, Los Angeles. 

Catalogue Note

Unique correspondence of love letters from Frida Kahlo to Diego Rivera. 

An exceptional collection of rare autograph letters which touch on the most intimate subjects of the artist’s life, including love letters as long as four and six pages, signed "Fisita," "Frida la llorona," "Tu Frida," "Tu antiquísima ocultadora," "Tu antigua ocultadora y niña Fisita." Kahlo's words embody the fierce passion that defined her relationship with Diego Rivera and led to their famous remarriage. Written in an endearing style--with various inks and coloured pencils on unusual types and sizes of paper--these letters also reveal Kahlo's tenderness and affection for Rivera. One of the notes bears a dried carnation; this floral scent was Kahlo's favorite perfume. Also included here are the couple’s second marriage certificate, several romantic envelopes used as note leaves, and a Yin Yang symbol drawn on a leaf which is a recurrent image in both Frida Kahlo and Diego Rivera’s work and appears many times in her diary. Kahlo is notably depicted holding this symbol in Rivera's magnificent mural Sueño de una tarde dominical en la Alameda Central [Dream of a Sunday Afternoon in Central Alameda]. This Chinese symbol becomes a metaphor for Rivera and Kahlo’s complex relationship: Rivera began as Kahlo’s mentor; they then married, separated, and got back together; they were political comrades; and they painted each other frequently.  

Kahlo compliments her “Lindo” Diego for his last paintings: "Niño de mis ojos, me parecío maravillosa la Ofrenda y todas las demás figuras" she says of the painting Dia de los Muertos [Day of the Dead] (1944) which Rivera was creating at the time. "Mañana les damos un lugar, tú y yo. Gracias vida mia, por lo prodigioso que eres."

Kahlo's health is one of the predominant subjects of her letters, although she tries not to dwell on the pain. On May 29, 1946, she writes Rivera from New York about the operation on her spine, which she had optimistically hoped would cure her excruciating back pain. But alas, the surgery did not work: “Diego mio, (…) me hicieron la punción para tratar de sacar el lipiodol pero no pudieron sacar ni una sola gota. No sufrí mucho pues aunque no quisieron darme anestesia general, me aguanté a lo macho tres piquetes con la esperanza de acabar con la maldita lata del lipiodol, pero ya ves tú mi vida, qué suerte tengo, nada salió”. Kahlo returns to Mexico in October where large doses of morphine are prescribed for her pain. Confined to an iron corset for eight months, Kahlo's health worsens and she develops anemia. At that time, her handwriting changes along with her paintings, her self-portraits in particular depicting her pain and suffering. Later that year, she mentions a little painting for Lina: "esté es el cuadrito para Lina [Boytler]" referring to El Venato Herido [the wounded deer] which she offered to Lina and Arcady Boytler as a wedding gift, representing her body as that of a deer stabbed by arrows. In the letter dated "23 de Feb 1948," she explains her hopes that painting will cure her from the pain: "He pasado unos dias muy difíciles, pero yo creo que comenzando a pintar me sentiré mejor."

While she is in New York, Kahlo attends to Rivera’s business: “Chester [Dale] vino a verme y me explicó lo de Rosemberg [sic]. Dice que él te puso un telegram para que no le contestes a Rosemberg hasta no saber de Chester ántes, pues quiere arreglar las cosas a su modo para que Rosemberg no crea que está haciendo un gran favor vendiendo tus cosas, sino que al revés tú le haces uno dejándoselas vender. Chester te escribirá en detalle. Hasta ahora, no le ha enseñado las acuarelas sino que quiere esperar la oportunidad de enseñarselas en su casa.”

This correspondence also illuminates the ups and downs of the couple’s often tempestuous relationship. In January 1948, Kahlo leaves Mexico City to get some rest in Veracruz, where she writes that being away from each other would do them both some good: “Me voy a Veracruz, para ver si realmente me alivio un poco del cansancio general que me ‘cargo.’ Como siempre que me he ido de ti, que llevo dentro, tu mundo y tu vida, asi es que de eso ya no me puedo aliviar. Pero creo que para los dos, está bien que por unos días o meses cambie el paisaje. (…) si me necesitas en cualquier forma, me llamas y me regreso volada (…) No estés triste – pinta y vive – yo te adoro con toda mi vida”. Kahlo still tries to comfort Rivera and does all she can to alleviate his worries: “Niño mio, pinté un poquito. Te quiero como tú sabes más que a mi vida (…) te mando mi corazón.”

In April 1953, a year before her death, Kahlo writes Rivera a letter that can be seen as a Will or final, painful declaration of love: “Diego, mi corazón, desde tu casa de Coyoacan, te espero, como te he esperado 23 años. El 19 de Agosto de 53, haremos 24 años de unión. Procuras regresar lo más pronto que puedas porque sin ti, México no existe (…)”.

Fine Books & Manuscripts, Including Americana

|
New York