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PROPERTY FROM THE ESTATE OF LUCILLE KAYE

Ferdinand Bol
PORTRAIT OF A MAN, HOLDING A WHITE PLUME
Estimate
150,000200,000
LOT SOLD. 158,500 USD
JUMP TO LOT
20

PROPERTY FROM THE ESTATE OF LUCILLE KAYE

Ferdinand Bol
PORTRAIT OF A MAN, HOLDING A WHITE PLUME
Estimate
150,000200,000
LOT SOLD. 158,500 USD
JUMP TO LOT

Details & Cataloguing

Important Old Master Paintings and Sculpture

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New York

Ferdinand Bol
DORDRECHT 1616 - 1680 AMSTERDAM
PORTRAIT OF A MAN, HOLDING A WHITE PLUME
signed and dated middle left: F.BOL, fct. / 1648
oil on canvas
35 1/2  by 28 1/2  in.; 90.2 by 72.4 cm.
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Provenance

With Levy Galleries, New York;
Gunning;
Their sale, New York, American Art Association, 27 April 1933, lot 27;
Mrs. Loomis C. Johnson, New York, Anderson, 28 October 1936, lot 55;
Gerard Winkin, Paris, 1923 (according to a label on the reverse);
Max Rothschild;
With F. Schnittjer & Son, New York;
Their sale, New York, Parke-Bernet Galleries, 14 January 1943, lot 43;
There purchased by Karl Loevenitch.

Literature

J.H.J Mellart, in The Burlington Magazine, October 1923, p. 154, reproduced plate IIA, no. 17;
A. Blankert, Ferdinand Bol (1616-1680): Rembrandt’s Pupil, Doornspijk 1982, p. 179, cat. no. R159A, (erroneously listed under rejected attributions).

Catalogue Note

Born in Dordrecht, Ferdinand Bol learned the rudiments of painting under the tutelage of Jacob Gerritsz Cuyp.  In 1637, at the age of twenty, Bol left Dordrecht for Amsterdam to work in the studio of Rembrandt whose influence would dominate the artist’s work for the rest of his career.  Here, Bol shows the sitter half-length, his torso and face turned toward the viewer and his right arm reaching across the foreground, holding an extravagant ostrich feather, as though it were a brush.  Recalling Rembrandt’s style of painting, the figure emerges from the dark background, the light catching the delicately rendered feather and casting shadows on the small yet stout hands, and flashes of red reflect in the gold of the elaborate brocaded cuff.  While this portrait remains indebted to Rembrandt, it is dated 1648, six years after Bol had left the workshop.  Unlike his Self-Portrait, Behind a Parapet of the same year, which very much imitates Rembrandt’s own conception (National Gallery, London, inv. no. NG672), we see here the artist beginning to establish his own independent style.

On the basis of recent photographs, Albert Blankert rescinded his ealier rejection of this portrait, now accepting it as an autograph work by Ferdinand Bol.  We are also grateful to Werner Sumowski and Fred Meijer for endorsing this attribution on the basis of photographs.

Important Old Master Paintings and Sculpture

|
New York