255

PROPERTY FROM THE COLLECTION OF DAVID C. COPLEY, LA JOLLA, CALIFORNIA

Camille Pissarro
LA MAISON RONDEST ET SON JARDIN À L'HERMITAGE, PONTOISE
Estimate
700,000900,000
LOT SOLD. 1,805,000 USD (Hammer Price with Buyer's Premium)
JUMP TO LOT
255

PROPERTY FROM THE COLLECTION OF DAVID C. COPLEY, LA JOLLA, CALIFORNIA

Camille Pissarro
LA MAISON RONDEST ET SON JARDIN À L'HERMITAGE, PONTOISE
Estimate
700,000900,000
LOT SOLD. 1,805,000 USD (Hammer Price with Buyer's Premium)
JUMP TO LOT

Details & Cataloguing

Impressionist & Modern Art Day Sale

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New York

Camille Pissarro
1830-1903
LA MAISON RONDEST ET SON JARDIN À L'HERMITAGE, PONTOISE
Signed C. Pissarro. and dated 78 (lower right)
Oil on canvas
21 5/8 by 25 3/4 in.
54.9 by 65.4 cm
Painted in 1878.
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Provenance

Mary Cassatt, New York
Mr. & Mrs. Horace Binney Hare, New York
Wildenstein & Co., New York (acquired by 1944)
Mr. & Mrs. Grover A. Magnin (acquired from the above in 1950 and sold: Parke-Bernet, New York, October 15, 1969, lot 3)
David T. Schiff, New York
Hirschl & Adler, New York (acquired from the above in 1971)
James & Helen K. Copley, La Jolla (acquired from the above in 1971)
Thence by descent

Exhibited

New York, Wildenstein & Co., Camille Pissarro: His Place in Art, 1945, no. 16
Chicago, The Arts Club of Chicago, Paintings by Camille Pissarro, 1946, no. 11
New York, Wildenstein & Co., French and American Nineteenth Century Painting, 1947, no. 20
Toledo, The Toledo Museum of Art, Pissarro, 1949, n.n.
New York, Wildenstein & Co., C. Pissarro, 1965, no. 16, illustrated in the catalogue (dated 1872)

Literature

Richard Guggenheimer, Sight and Insight: A Prediction of New Perceptions in Art, Port Washington, New York, 1945, illustrated p. 119
Jerrold Lanes, "Current and Forthcoming Exhibitons. New York" in The Burlington Magazine, May 1965, p. 275
Joachim Pissarro & Claire Durand-Ruel Snollaerts, Pissarro, Catalogue critique des peintures, vol. II, Paris, 2005, no. 555, illustrated in color p. 380

Catalogue Note

While living in Pontoise, Pissarro still travelled frequently to Paris. John Rewald describes the atmosphere at the Café de la Nouvelle-Athènes, which the Impressionist group began to frequent around 1876 and where Pissarro would visit during his Parisian trips: “With books and cigarettes the time passed in agreeable estheticisms at the café: Manet loud, declamatory; Degas sharp, more profound, scornfully sarcastic; Duranty clearheaded, dry, full of repressed disappointment. Pissarro, looking like Abraham—his beard was white and his hair was white and he was bald, though at the time he was not yet fifty—sat listening, approving of their ideas, joining in the conversation quietly. No one was kinder than Pissarro, [George] Moore later remembered. He would always take the trouble to explain to students from the École des Beaux-Arts why their teacher Jules Lefebvre was not a great master of drawing. Pissarro’s innate pedagogical gifts expressed themselves on every occasion with soft insistence and perfect clarity. ‘He was so much a teacher,’ Mary Cassatt later stated, ‘that he could have taught stones how to draw correctly’” (John Rewald, The History of Impressionism, New York, 1976, pp. 405-06).

Painted in 1878, the present work depicts a landscape near the town of Pontoise, where Pissarro lived from 1866 until 1883. In deciding to move to Pontoise, the artist was partly guided by a desire to separate himself from the influence of his predecessors, the established French landscape painters, and to depict an environment scarcely recorded by other masters.  Located some twenty-five miles northwest of Paris, Pontoise was built on a hilltop, with the river Oise passing through it, making it a highly picturesque environment in which to paint en plein air. The town's economy thrived on agriculture as well as industry, offering Pissarro a wide range of subjects, from crowded semi-urban genre scenes and views of roads and factories to farmers working on the fields and isolated landscapes devoid of human presence.

La Maison Rondest et son jardin à l'Hermitage, Pontoise was formerly in the collection of Mary Cassatt, who also acquired other works by Pissarro for her personal collection. More than a decade after he painted the present work Pissarro commented on Cassatt’s prints (while they were exhibiting together at Durand-Ruel), describing her tones as "even, subtle, delicate, without stains on the seams: adorable blues, fresh rose, etc... The result is admirable, as beautiful as Japanese work. And it’s done with printer’s ink” (quoted in Ralph Shikes & Paula Harper, Pissarro, His Life and Work, New York, 1980, pp. 256-58).

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