Lot 8
  • 8

Zhang Daqian (Chang Dai-chien, 1899-1983)

Estimate
2,500,000 - 4,000,000 HKD
Sold
5,560,000 HKD
bidding is closed

Description

  • Zhang Daqian (Chang Dai-chien, 1899-1983)
  • SELF-PORTRAIT
  • ink and colour on paper, hanging scroll, 1960
  • 70.5 BY 47.5 CM. 27¾ BY 18⅝ IN.
with one seal of the artist, and two collector’s seals, one on the titleslip. Titleslip by Kao Ling-mei

Inscription:
I painted this and sent it to my “brother” Ling-mei in the first lunar month of the gengzi year when I was sixty-one. With my hair all white, I am indeed advanced in years. Dai-chien Yuan, Mogi Garden, São Paulo.

Exhibited

Hong Kong, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Art Gallery, The Mei Yun Tang
Collection of Paintings by Chang Dai-chien, 17 April-23 May 1993
Japan, Tokyo, Shoto Museum of Art, The Mei Yun Tang Collection of Paintings by Chang
Dai-chien, 5 April-21 May 1995
Singapore, Singapore Art Museum, The Mei Yun Tang Collection of Paintings by Chang
Dai-chien, 28 February-27 April 1997

Literature

Chinese Paintings with the Original Paintings & Discourses on Chinese Art By Professor Chang Dai-chien, edited by Kao Ling-mei, East Art Co., Hong Kong, February 1961, p. 95
Mingpao Monthly, Issue 13, Mingpao Newspapers Limited, Hong Kong, January 1967
The Study of Mogao Caves by Chang Dai-chien, National Palace Museum, Taipei, April 1985, pl. 2
Research on Zhang Daqian’s Paintings, written by Ba Dong, Fine Arts Research Institute, National Taiwan Normal University, May 1987, pl. 140
The Mei Yun Tang Collection of Paintings by Chang Dai-chien, edited by Kao Mayching, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Art Gallery, Hong Kong, 1993, pl. 29
Commemorating Chang Dai-chien”, written by Wen C. Fong, published in The
International Conference on the Poetry, Calligraphy, and Painting of Chang Dai-chien
and P‘u Hsin-yu: proceedings, National Museum of History, Taipei, May 1994, p. 41
The Paintings of Zhang Daqian (Chang Dai-chien): Unity of Tradition and Modernity”,
written by Kao Mayching, published in Arts of Asia, May-June 1994, cover
The Mei Yun Tang Collection of Paintings by Chang Dai-chien, Shoto Museum of Art,
Japan, 1995, pl. 28
A Chang Dai-chien Appears Only Once a Half-Millennium, written by Hwang Tien-tsai, Shi Jh Tang Press Ltd., Taipei, November 1998, p. 232
Between Two Cultures: Late-Nineteenth and Early-Twentieth Century Chinese Painting
from the Robert H. Ellsworth Collection, written by Wen C. Fong, Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, 2001, pl. 99
Zhang Daqian and I, written by Zhou Shixin , Dolphin Books, Beijing, March 2011, p. 86

Catalogue Note

Of Hair And Beards

The hair and beards, if not painted properly, may look like a cluster
of water-soaked black cotton wool stuck to a reluctant head. The old
masters of the T'ang and Sung Dynasties are most adept in the art of
painting hair and beards. Their technique is to execute a dozen odd
fine strokes with a thin brush and condensed ink at suitable places,
according to the shape of the face, then to wash them over with diluted
ink two or three times. That gives the hair and beards a pliant and
lustrous appearance, as though each individual one is traceable to its
root, and naturally they look graceful and lovely.

Extracted from Chinese Painting with the Original Paintings and
Discourses on Chinese Art by Professor Chang Dai-chien
Edited and compiled by Kao Ling-mei
Translated by Yao Hsin-nung
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