167
167
Natural pearl, gem set and diamond brooch/ pendant, Georges Fouquet, Late 19th Century
Estimate
12,00015,000
LOT SOLD. 97,250 GBP
JUMP TO LOT
167
Natural pearl, gem set and diamond brooch/ pendant, Georges Fouquet, Late 19th Century
Estimate
12,00015,000
LOT SOLD. 97,250 GBP
JUMP TO LOT

Details & Cataloguing

The Jewellery Collection of the Late Michael Wellby: An Eclectic Eye - Jewels Spanning Four Centuries

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London

Natural pearl, gem set and diamond brooch/ pendant, Georges Fouquet, Late 19th Century
Designed as a lady with flowing hair and headdress, the face and hair composed of carved chalcedony, applied with plique-à-jour enamel and highlighted with cabochon and circular-cut rubies, circular-cut and rose diamonds, suspending a natural pearl, pendant loop, signed G. Fouquet and numbered, French assay marks, case, Fouquet.
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Literature

Cf: Michael Koch 'The Belle Epoque of French Jewellery 1850-1910' Thomas Heneage & Co 1990, pages 294-315 for examaples of jewellery by Fouquet.

Catalogue Note

Accompanied by report from The Gem & Pearl Laboratory no. 06292 stating the pearl was found to be natural, saltwater.

Georges Fouquet 1862-1957 was a third generation Parisian jeweller and one of the leading exponents of Art Nouveau jewellery winning great praise at the Paris International Exhibition in 1900 with jewels designed by Alphonse Mucha. Mucha was also responsible for designing Fouquet new salon at 6 Rue Royale which Fouquet moved to in 1900. His jewels are typically heavily inspired by nature infused with the female form, utilising fine enamel work.

The Art Nouveau movement was a short lived flowering of creativity which grew out of the reaction against mechanisation of the second half of the 19th century. Its period of creativity was short lived lasting from the closing decades of the 19th century until just before the Great War of 1914. A reactionary movement, it sought inspiration from the organic forms of nature and femininity, infused with a dream like quality. Many of the plants and flowers beloved of the Victorians, the iris, fuchsia and lily, were adopted by the Art Nouveau movement, but took on a more realistic and life like form.

This change in attitude to the depiction of nature was influenced by the works of John Ruskin, Owen Jones and A.W.N. Pugin as well as the emerging interest in Japanese decorative arts. Jewellers of this period drew on these influences and re-worked it into the new ideology with its interest in nature’s cycle of death and rebirth, infused with the feeling of movement. Other favoured motifs of the movement where fantastical zoomorphic animals, sea monsters, serpents, chimeras and the dragonfly, sometimes merged with the contours of the female form.

The Jewellery Collection of the Late Michael Wellby: An Eclectic Eye - Jewels Spanning Four Centuries

|
London