202
202

PROPERTY FROM A PRIVATE AMERICAN COLLECTOR

Joan Miró
LE PÈRE UBU
Estimate
300,000400,000
LOT SOLD. 314,500 USD
JUMP TO LOT
202

PROPERTY FROM A PRIVATE AMERICAN COLLECTOR

Joan Miró
LE PÈRE UBU
Estimate
300,000400,000
LOT SOLD. 314,500 USD
JUMP TO LOT

Details & Cataloguing

Impressionist & Modern Art Day Sale

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New York

Joan Miró
1893 - 1983
LE PÈRE UBU
Inscribed Miró and numbered 1/4
Bronze
Length: 47 1/2 in.
120.7 cm
Conceived and cast in 1973 in an edition of 4 by Fonderia Artistica Bonvicini, Verona.
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Provenance

Galerie Lelong, Paris
Galeria Pelaires, Palma de Mallorca
Acquired from the above

Literature

Miró (exhibition catalogue), Fondation Maeght, Saint-Paul-de-Vence, 1979, no. 303, illustration of another cast p. 190
Miró (exhibition catalogue), Pelaires Centre Cultural Contemporani, Palma, 1999, illustration of another cast p. 65
Alain Jouffroy & Joan Teixidor, Miró Sculptures, Paris, 1980, no. 277, illustration of another cast p. 194
Emilio Fernández Miró & Pilar Ortega Chapel, Joan Miró, Sculptures. Catalogue raisonné1928-1982, Paris, 2006, no. 302, illustration of another cast p. 288

Catalogue Note

Miró’s sculptures are among his most inventive works, incorporating found objects, items from nature and the artist’s own iconography. His first venture into sculpture occurred in the early 1930s, although Miró suggests that the seed was planted in his mind much earlier. He recalls the unconventional teaching style of Galí—his instructor from 1912 to 1915—stating, “Galí was a remarkable teacher, and he gave me an exercise so that I would learn to ‘see’ form: He blindfolded me, and placed objects in my hands, then asked me to draw the objects without having seen them. So my interest in sculpture actually dates from that time” (Miró Sculptures (exhibition catalogue), Royal Scottish Academy, Edinburgh, 1992, p. 33). While his early sculptures were often assemblage pieces made of actual found objects, Miró’s later sculptural works were commonly large bronzes, generally anthropomorphic in form and often inspired by found objects. 

Miró’s approach to sculpture differed from his approach to painting. He formed a new process of creation which in turn led to different qualities in his work. Jacques Dupin affirms the difference in approach stating, “In painting, Miró produced his pictograms through the reduction and stylization of reality. Sculpture, on the contrary, allowed Miró to begin with concrete reality and collected objects, which were then internalized and plunged into the fires of his imagination, thereby producing three-dimensional images. These images echoed similar ones from the painter’s universe; though it might perhaps be more accurate to say they crossed paths near the end of their journey, without dissolving one into the other” (Jacques Dupin, Miró, New York, 1993, p. 361).

Impressionist & Modern Art Day Sale

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