79
79

PROPERTY FROM A PRIVATE COLLECTION, TO BE SOLD FOR THE BENEFIT OF THE ASOCIACION DE DAMAS SALESIANAS FOUNDATION

Julio Romero de Torres
SPANISH
LA MUJER DEL CÁNTARO (GIRL BY A WELL)
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79

PROPERTY FROM A PRIVATE COLLECTION, TO BE SOLD FOR THE BENEFIT OF THE ASOCIACION DE DAMAS SALESIANAS FOUNDATION

Julio Romero de Torres
SPANISH
LA MUJER DEL CÁNTARO (GIRL BY A WELL)
JUMP TO LOT

Details & Cataloguing

European Paintings

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Julio Romero de Torres
1879-1930
SPANISH
LA MUJER DEL CÁNTARO (GIRL BY A WELL)

signed and inscribed JULIO ROMERO DE TORRES / CÓRDOBA lower left


oil on canvas
125.5 by 85cm., 49½ by 33½in.
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We are grateful to Mercedes Valverde Candil for her assistance in cataloguing this work.

Literature

Julio Romero de Torres: Símbolo, Materia y Obsesión, exh. cat., Córdoba, 2003, p. 100, illustrated

Catalogue Note

In his depiction of the female form Romero de Torres drew on certain key symbols and attributes to evoke an image of his subject that goes beyond the individual to portray a certain type and a quintessentially Spanish spirit. In the present work, painted circa 1910, his depiction of a girl at a well, a pail in her hand and a church in the distance, is an especially fine representation of both faith and purity.

Romero de Torres sets his model in front of the Plaza del Cristo de los Faroles (Square of Christ of the Lanterns) - a much revered location in the artist's native Cordoba. The church in the background is that of the Capuchins Convent. It was a square in the city that the artist incorporated into a number of his compositions. The religious references in the present work chime perfectly with the girl's upright bearing, cool demeanour and forthright gaze.

Formally attired in a high collared white blouse and long skirt with a crimson shawl draped decorously over her right arm and shoulder, tucked in at her waist, the elegantly attenuated fingers of the girl's right hand hold the handle of a pail, while her left hand points backwards, making the association of herself with her Christian beliefs in the form of the calvary and church crystal clear. 

As well as references to the Church, other symbols and attributes that Romero de Torres incorporated into his work included musical imagery, notably the guitar, and fruit - oranges in particular - to evoke courtship, love and lust. But it is his references to water, both overt as in the present work, and more covert - through his depiction of vessels and vases - that feature as prominently in his iconographical scheme.

The elemental link between water as an image of purity and its association with the primacy of Spanish culture was popularised in particular in his painting Fuensanta in which Romero also depicts his model by a well, her arms resting on a metal pitcher. The work was famously featured as the image on the face of the Spanish 100 peseta note after the Second World War (fig. 1).

European Paintings

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