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PROPERTY FROM A WASHINGTON D.C. COLLECTION

Redlands Pottery
A RARE "CRAB" FLOWER BOWL
Estimate
12,00018,000
LOT SOLD. 43,750 USD
JUMP TO LOT
10

PROPERTY FROM A WASHINGTON D.C. COLLECTION

Redlands Pottery
A RARE "CRAB" FLOWER BOWL
Estimate
12,00018,000
LOT SOLD. 43,750 USD
JUMP TO LOT

Details & Cataloguing

Important 20th Century Design

|
New York

Redlands Pottery
A RARE "CRAB" FLOWER BOWL
with molded mark REDLANDS/POTTERY around a circle enclosing a tadpole
glazed earthenware
3 3/8  in. (8.6 cm) high 5 in. (12.7 cm) diameter
circa 1904-1909
executed by Wesley H. Trippett
Read Condition Report Read Condition Report

Provenance

Chevy Chase, Maryland Estate
Acquired from the above by the present owner

Literature

Shapes of Clay, Redlands Pottery sales brochure, Redlands, CA, n.d. (for a similar bowl in the form of a crab)
Leslie Greene Bowman, American Arts & Crafts, Virtue in Design, Los Angeles, 1990, p. 175, cat. no. 167 (for a similar bowl in the collection of the Los Angeles County Museum of Art)

Catalogue Note

Wesley H. Trippett began his career working for Tiffany Studios in New York as a designer of architectural and decorative metalwork.  Although never formally trained as a potter, Trippett became acquainted with clay as a medium for creating models.  Plagued with tuberculosis, he moved to California for his health around 1895 and settled in Redlands.  After experimenting with local clay deposits and building his own potter’s wheel, Trippett founded Redlands Pottery around 1904.

A Redlands Pottery sales brochure provides an anecdotal account of Trippett's inspiration: "About three years ago, while looking for a damp place where some tadpoles, that had served science and amused a group of children, might continue their evolution and in course of time reach frogs' estate, the writer, who was accompanied by W. H. Trippett of Redlands, happened upon a surface bed of damp clay.  This discovery at once suggested to Mr. Trippett the possibilities of such material,-modeling, pottery, Redlands Pottery,-why not?  He acted upon the suggestion."

Working entirely on his own, Trippett produced a small repertoire of bowls and vases inspired by animals and plants indigenous to the west coast.  Trippett employed bisque finishes for most of his vessels in order to reveal the color and quality of the local California clays.  The Paul Elder Company of San Francisco retailed Trippett's figural wares in their 1905 trade catalogue, illustrating "flower bowls" available in "various sizes, nearly round in shape, with figures of crabs and frogs in relief" and vessels "with covers ornamented with figures in relief of horn-toads, crabs, frogs, lizards, and rabbits."  The burnished surfaces of these simple forms with applied naturalistic depictions of local wildlife were in line with the Craftsman ideals that Trippett adopted, which for him were a reaction against the contemporary Art Nouveau style that had dominated his early career.

Trippett probably closed Redlands Pottery in 1909.  In 1911 he moved to National City (near San Diego) to head the art department of the California China Products Company, and in 1913 he died of tuberculosis.  Surviving examples of Trippett's distinct figural vessels from his brief career as a potter are scarce and are represented in the collections of Los Angeles County Museum of Art and Oakland Museum of California.

Important 20th Century Design

|
New York