141
141

PROPERTY OF THE NOBLE FAMILY BARNAART

An Italian micromosaic and malachite veneered topped carved giltwood centre table, the top Roman, the base Florentine

second quarter 19th century

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141

PROPERTY OF THE NOBLE FAMILY BARNAART

An Italian micromosaic and malachite veneered topped carved giltwood centre table, the top Roman, the base Florentine

second quarter 19th century

JUMP TO LOT

Details & Cataloguing

Important Furniture, Ceramics, Clocks, Tapestries, Silver & Vertu

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An Italian micromosaic and malachite veneered topped carved giltwood centre table, the top Roman, the base Florentine

second quarter 19th century

the circular top centred by a neo-classical female figure in a chariot amongst cupids and amorini with a Roman centurion, within a border of classical grotesque masks, birds, butterflies and floral swags within a veneered malachite border, the associated carved giltwood base with a pierced frieze carved with female masks amongst  flowers, foliage and scrolls on a cross-hatched ground on three infant term supports holding aloft a stylised scallopshell with a fruiting swag around their waists, on inward scrolled leaf carved cabriole legs joined by a stretcher centred by a fruit and flower filled wicker basket on leaf carved flattened bun feet
89cm. high, approx 120cm. diameter; 2ft.11in., 3ft.11¼in.
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Provenance

By repute acquired by Jonkheer Willem Philip Barnaart during the 19th century for his family home, Barnaart House, Nieuwe Gracht 7, Haarlem, The Netherlands; Until sold with the house to the Province of Noord-Holland in 1880, the house then became the official residence of the Commissaris van de Koningin (The Queen's Provincial Governor for the Province); In 1940 the furnishings were removed and brought over to the Provinciehuis, Haarlem;
From 1960, the piece has been in store at the Provinciehuis.

Catalogue Note

This beautiful example of a Roman micromosaic could well be from the workship of Camillo Poggioli (active in the second quarter of the 19th century). This tentative attribution can be made for a number of reasons. The minutely cut tesserae finely arranged to form a wreath of swags filled with colourful foliage and tied with blue ribbon, is a decorative flourish that Poggioli used; we know this as there is a documented table by him which shares this decorative device. This table centred by a bird and in the Gilbert Collection is illustrated Jeanette Hanisse Gabriel, The Gilbert Collection, Micromosaics, London, 2000, p. 107, fig. 51. It too features further decorative bands and has a bold, plain hardstone border, like one in malachite on the offered lot.

Important Furniture, Ceramics, Clocks, Tapestries, Silver & Vertu

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London