229
229
A Large Pottery Storage Vessel, Umayyad or Almohad Spain, 11th-12th Century
Estimate
120,000160,000
LOT SOLD. 145,250 GBP
JUMP TO LOT
229
A Large Pottery Storage Vessel, Umayyad or Almohad Spain, 11th-12th Century
Estimate
120,000160,000
LOT SOLD. 145,250 GBP
JUMP TO LOT

Details & Cataloguing

Arts of the Islamic World

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A Large Pottery Storage Vessel, Umayyad or Almohad Spain, 11th-12th Century
of deep cylindrical drum form with a flat base and raised moulding around the rim, decorated around the body with an upper frieze of foliated kufic above the body decorated with medallions each encircling either a flowerhead or animal, including a griffin, lion and deer, with large, scrolling arabesques interspersed throughout
62.5cm. height
38cm. diameter
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Catalogue Note

inscriptions

Twice:  al-sa'ada  'Happiness'

This large storage vessel is comparable to several examples made both during the Spanish Umayyad Caliphate (909-1031) and the Almohad dynasty (1145-1232). A similar, Umayyad pottery storage vessel was sold in these rooms on 5 October 2010, lot 72. It is interesting to note the description of that vessel was as a container for liquids, possibly drinking water; the vessel in this sale would have probably served the same purpose. Another related vessel, but dated to the Almohad dynasty (twelfth-thirteenth Century) is illustrated in Martínez Caviró, B., Cerámica hispanomusulmana. Andalusí y mudéjar, Madrid, 1991, no.34. The present storage vessel shares similar characteristics to both of these examples, notably, the form, which is deep and cylindrical with a slightly flared rim, as well as the green and dark beige colours used in the decoration.

Another three examples, from the Museo Arqueológico, Cordoba, and the Museo Arqueológico, Madrid, are illustrated in Paris, 2001, pp.134-135 and 148, figs. 135, 160 and 161. These include a large cylindrical vessel dated to the tenth/eleventh Centuries from Andalusia (Cordoba, inv. 617), which would definitely have been used as a container for liquids as it has a spout at the bottom. It is partially decorated in the cuerda seca technique with a zig-zag and wave pattern to the rim with a single band of repeating heart-shapes leading to the spout. The other two examples were used as well-brinks and share similar stylistic motifs with the illustrated storage vessel such as open palmettes and a floral script. These are in the Museo Arqueológico, Madrid (inv. 12378) and Cordoba (inv. 7515).


 

Arts of the Islamic World

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London