181
181
A Rare and Important Silk Tunic With Arabic Inscription, Sogdiana, Central Asia, 8th Century
Estimate
400,000600,000
LOT SOLD. 481,250 GBP
JUMP TO LOT
181
A Rare and Important Silk Tunic With Arabic Inscription, Sogdiana, Central Asia, 8th Century
Estimate
400,000600,000
LOT SOLD. 481,250 GBP
JUMP TO LOT

Details & Cataloguing

Arts of the Islamic World

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London

A Rare and Important Silk Tunic With Arabic Inscription, Sogdiana, Central Asia, 8th Century
composed of four different silks sown together, decorated with repeating roundel designs, including a paired cow suckling her calf being attacked by a lion to the front, paired deer facing each other on the sleeves, and paired pheasants with a stylised lotus between their beaks on the reverse, the roundels consisting of several concentric elements or curving coloured petals with a variety of motifs depicted between them  
69cm. length
approx. 140cm. width

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Catalogue Note

inscriptions

Repeated in both negative and positive, undeciphered, apart from the word li'llah 'God's'

Composed of at least four types of silks woven principally with red, dark blue, green, white, and dark yellow threads, this tunic demonstrates a variety of Sassanian derived textile motifs. The original and principal textile of the garment is decorated with large roundels featuring a cow suckling her calf being attacked by a lion above her. The space in between the roundels is filled with a symmetrical quatrefoil enclosing palmettes. The deer within the roundels on the sleeves are decorated with a geometric pattern of right-angled motifs. This design is similar to that of other silks representing deer in the Abegg-Stiftung museum, Riggisberg, Switzerland (no.4901). The roundel designs on the reverse garment show pheasants standing on a small vegetal platform with stylised lotuses between their beaks. A small woven inscription in white was recently discovered by the seam near the shoulder and has been revealed by recent conservation. The lining silk visible at the bottom of the garment and behind the neck is plain in a simple, fine tabby weave, made of silk yarn without twist, a typical Chinese product.

Arts of the Islamic World

|
London