406
406
Evgeny Lanceray (1848-1886), A Russian Bronze: Svyatoslav on the Way to Tsargrad
Estimate
80,000100,000
LOT SOLD. 92,500 USD
JUMP TO LOT
406
Evgeny Lanceray (1848-1886), A Russian Bronze: Svyatoslav on the Way to Tsargrad
Estimate
80,000100,000
LOT SOLD. 92,500 USD
JUMP TO LOT

Details & Cataloguing

Russian Art

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New York

Evgeny Lanceray (1848-1886), A Russian Bronze: Svyatoslav on the Way to Tsargrad
gilded, the prince of Kievan Rus shown astride a tense and wind-blown steed gesturing with his sword while rallying his troops
the front of the base with a plaque inscribed in Cyrillic reading "We would rather fall in battle than bring shame on Russia's lands / Svyatoslav, on the road to Tsargrad in 970," inscribed with signature and with the mark of the Shtange foundry
Length 21 in.
53.3 cm
Read Condition Report Read Condition Report

Literature

"E.A. Lansere," Niva 1886, no. 16, p. 418

L.P. Shaposhnikova, Skulptura XVIII-nachalo XX veka, Leningrad, 1988, p. 94, nos. 660-662

I.M. Shmidt, Russkaia skulptura vtoroi poloviny XIX-nachala XX veka, Moscow, 1989, pp. 49, 52-53

Gosudarstvennaia Tretiakovskaia galereia, katalog sobraniia: Skulptura XVIII-XIX vekov, Moscow, 2000, pp. 58, 192-193.

N.R. Levinson and L.N. Goncharova, Russkaia khudozhestvennaia bronza (reprint), Moscow, 2001, pp. 113, 189, no. 53.

G.W. Sudbury, Evgueni Alexandrovitch Lanceray, 1848-1886, Lausanne, 2006, pp. 82-83, 165-166

Catalogue Note

This was one of the last works Lanceray completed before his untimely death and his masterful handling of the patriotic warrior astride a fiery steed has been viewed as a fitting summation of his illustrious career. Svyatoslav I (ca. 942-972), son of Igor and Olga of Kiev, is primarily remembered for his successful military campaigns in eastern and southern Europe, which resulted in the expansion of Kievan Rus' into the largest state in Europe. Although he was ultimately unsuccessful in taking Tsargrad (the Slavonic name for Constantinople), his heroic deeds and success in acquiring Byzantine lands attracted the attention of Russian artists during the Russo-Turkish Wars of 1768-1774 and 1877-1878.  Thus it was a natural gift for a Russian officer and there is some evidence that casts of this bronze were presented to successful military leaders or regiments.  It is known that the Kiev Hussars, the heroes of the Battle of Katzbach, were presented with this patriotic sculpture by one of their brother regiments. 

Russian Art

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New York