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PROPERTY FROM AN IMPORTANT PRIVATE COLLECTION, USA

Nikolai Konstantinovich Roerich
THE TREASURE
JUMP TO LOT
22

PROPERTY FROM AN IMPORTANT PRIVATE COLLECTION, USA

Nikolai Konstantinovich Roerich
THE TREASURE
JUMP TO LOT

Details & Cataloguing

Russian Art Evening Sale

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London

Nikolai Konstantinovich Roerich
1874-1947
THE TREASURE
signed with monogram and dated 1919 l.l.

oil and tempera on canvas


100.2 by 149cm., 39 1/2 by 58 3/4 in.
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Provenance

Roerich Museum, New York, 1923–1935
Nettie & Louis Horch, USA
Da Motta Collection, New York

Exhibited

Helsinki, Salon Strindberg, Nicholas Roerich Taidenäyttely, opened March 29, 1919
London, The Goupil Gallery, Nicolas Roerich. Spells of Russia, April-July, 1920
Worthing, The Public Art Gallery, Nicolas Roerich. Spells of Russia, July–August, 1920
New York, Kingor Galleries; Boston, Boston Art Club; Buffalo, Albright Art Gallery; Chicago, Art Institute; St Louis, City Art Museum; San Francisco, Museum of Art; Omaha, Fine Arts Society; Kansas, City Art Institute; Cleveland, Museum of Art; Indianapolis, Herron Art Institute; Minnesota State fair; Milwaukee, Art Institute; Detroit, Institute of Art, and more cities.  The Nicholas Roerich Exhibition, 1920–1923
New York, Roerich Museum, 1923–1935 (permanent collection)

Literature

Salon Strindberg, Nicholas Roerich Taidenäyttely No71, Helsinki, 1919, No. 73 (as "Aarteet")
N.Jarintzov,  Nicholas K. Roerich. London: The Studio, 1920, p. 8 (ill.)The Goupil Gallery, Nicolas Roerich. Spells of Russia, 1920. No. 95  The Public Art Gallery, Worthing, Nicolas Roerich. Spells of Russia, 1920. No. 76
C. Brinton, The Nicholas Roerich Exhibition, New York, 1921. No. 9, (ill. plate 12)
F. Grant et al, Roerich, Himalaya, A Monograph, New York: Brentano Publ., 1926. p. 197
Roerich Museum Catalogue, New York: Roerich Museum, 1930. No. 9

Catalogue Note

The Treasure displays Roerich's fascination with the legends of ancient wanderers who "remembered the call of other remote mountains, and again strove onward, counting nor the days, nor years, nor centuries of their wandering." The treasures they left behind were not simply tangible relics but symbols whose very essence rested in their mysterious and unreachable quality. The secrets of these treasures, which were cultural and spiritual rather than material, had to be kept hidden in order to be preserved, especially in desperate times. Roerich himself was forced to flee to Finland in 1917 at the outbreak of the revolution, and the tragedy and dissolution of his surroundings inspired a nostalgic appreciation of the mystical past. As one critic described it, "Nicholas Roerich is himself an idealist to whom reality is but a suggestion of that which lies beyond." This particular painting, one that reflects typical Karelian scenery, is a more polished culmination of the hundreds of rough sketches he produced in the following two years. The landscape's bold outlines and relatively simple composition reflect a primitiveness that is conceptual and carefully constructed rather than spontaneous, as if every inch of paint is as sacred as the ancient traditions he admired.

We are grateful to Gvido Trepša, Senior Researcher, Nicholas Roerich Museum, New York for providing this note.

Russian Art Evening Sale

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London