119
119
Joyce, James.
TYPED LETTER SIGNED ("SINCERELY YOURS | JAMES JOYCE"), TO SIR THOMAS BEECHAM, WITH ONE MANUSCRIPT REVISION (POSSIBLY IN THE HAND OF HIS WIFE, NORA BARNACLE)
Estimate
4,0007,000
LOT SOLD. 6,250 GBP
JUMP TO LOT
119
Joyce, James.
TYPED LETTER SIGNED ("SINCERELY YOURS | JAMES JOYCE"), TO SIR THOMAS BEECHAM, WITH ONE MANUSCRIPT REVISION (POSSIBLY IN THE HAND OF HIS WIFE, NORA BARNACLE)
Estimate
4,0007,000
LOT SOLD. 6,250 GBP
JUMP TO LOT

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English Literature, History, Children's Books & Illustrations

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Joyce, James.
TYPED LETTER SIGNED ("SINCERELY YOURS | JAMES JOYCE"), TO SIR THOMAS BEECHAM, WITH ONE MANUSCRIPT REVISION (POSSIBLY IN THE HAND OF HIS WIFE, NORA BARNACLE)

informing him that he has "heard with great pleasure from Miss Cunard" of his intention to engage his friend the tenor John Sullivan for the centenary performances of William Tell  "in England", that his friend has often spoken of him in terms of great admiration, and detailing the tenor's current and future engagements (in Dublin, London and Algiers, for instance) and expressing the great envy he will feel for the London audience who will hear "for the first time his magnificent rendering of Arnould, unique in the world" ; going on to recommend a "novel and interesting" article on the history of the tenor voice by his friend, the young Neapolitan composer Edgardo Carducci (a pupil of Benedetto Croce, and also an admirer of Sullivan's), which Joyce feels may be suitable for Beecham's magazine Milo (a copy of which Nancy Cunard has recently shown him), with Joyce then discussuing it in some detail, revealing some of the depth of his own musical knowledge ("...So far as I have been able to discover during the whole history of opera  during the last hundred and forty years, only four English tenors have ever succeeded in winning the suffrage of the Italian public..."), 3pp., 4to, folded twice, 192 Rue de Grenelle, Paris, 21 March 1930; together with carbon copy typescript of the programme for Sullivan's concert given at the Theatre Royal in Dublin (undated, but possibly that for the tenor's first concert there, of 27 April 1930)

a fine unpublished joyce letter to one of britain's greatest ever conductors, championing the musical qualties of the irish-french opera signer john sullivan ("incomparably the greatest human  voice that I  have ever heard for ease of emission, power, splendour of diction and magnificence of tone").   Joyce had met Sullivan in Paris in 1929; during the course of 1930 he conducted a series of intricate manoeuvres to persuade Sir Thomas Beecham to hear Sullivan in Guillaume Tell in Paris, finally succeeding in September. The tenor had appeared at Covent Garden in 1927 but never returned: his scheduled engagement of 20 June 1932--when Beecham was back at the Royal Opera House, probably not the planned performance Joyce is referring to here, about which he may have been mistaken--was "mysteriously cancelled" (Richard Ellmann, ed., The Letters of James Joyce, volume 3, p.196, footnote).


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Joyce, typed letter signed to Sir Thomas Beecham, 1930

Catalogue Note

informing him that he has "heard with great pleasure from Miss Cunard" of his intention to engage his friend the tenor John Sullivan for the centenary performances of William Tell  "in England", that his friend has often spoken of him in terms of great admiration, and detailing the tenor's current and future engagements (in Dublin, London and Algiers, for instance) and expressing the great envy he will feel for the London audience who will hear "for the first time his magnificent rendering of Arnould, unique in the world" ; going on to recommend a "novel and interesting" article on the history of the tenor voice by his friend, the young Neapolitan composer Edgardo Carducci (a pupil of Benedetto Croce, and also an admirer of Sullivan's), which Joyce feels may be suitable for Beecham's magazine Milo (a copy of which Nancy Cunard has recently shown him), with Joyce then discussuing it in some detail, revealing some of the depth of his own musical knowledge ("...So far as I have been able to discover during the whole history of opera  during the last hundred and forty years, only four English tenors have ever succeeded in winning the suffrage of the Italian public..."), 3pp., 4to, folded twice, 192 Rue de Grenelle, Paris, 21 March 1930; together with carbon copy typescript of the programme for Sullivan's concert given at the Theatre Royal in Dublin (undated, but possibly that for the tenor's first concert there, of 27 April 1930)

a fine unpublished joyce letter to one of britain's greatest ever conductors, championing the musical qualties of john sullivan ("incomparably the greatest human  voice that I  have ever heard for ease of emission, power, splendour of diction and magnificence of tone"). The article which Joyce recommends here concludes with an assesment of the "exceptional place" which Sullivan occupies among modern tenors.

At this point in his career (when he had been working heavily on Haveth Childers Everywhere, and was suffering chronic eye problems, leading up to his cataract operation in Zurich on 15 May 1930) Joyce was also energetically championing the Irish-French opera singer John Sullivan (originally from Cork, of a Kerry family, d.c.1958), whom he had met in Paris in 1929 through the introduction of his brother Stanislaus. During the course of 1930 Joyce conducted a series of intricate manoeuvres to persuade Sir Thomas Beecham to hear Sullivan in Guillaume Tell in Paris, finally succeeding in September (they went with Nancy Cunard, Beecham apparently telling Joyce afterwards "that it was the most amazing tenor voice he had ever heard and that he would do all he could for him in London" -- see letter to Mrs Herbert Gorman, 5 October 1930, The Letters of James Joyce, volume 3, p.203). By this time the tenor had already appeared at Covent Garden once, as Raoul in two performances of Les Huguenots during the 1927 international season. However he never returned: his scheduled engagement of 20 June 1932--when Beecham was back at the Royal Opera House, probably not the planned performance Joyce is referring to here, about which he may have been mistaken--was "mysteriously cancelled" (Richard Ellmann, ed., The Letters of James Joyce, volume 3, p.196, footnote).

English Literature, History, Children's Books & Illustrations

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