2820
2820
A FINELY CARVED ROCK CRYSTAL VASE GROUP AND STAINED IVORY STAND
QING DYNASTY, 18TH CENTURY
Estimate
800,0001,200,000
JUMP TO LOT
2820
A FINELY CARVED ROCK CRYSTAL VASE GROUP AND STAINED IVORY STAND
QING DYNASTY, 18TH CENTURY
Estimate
800,0001,200,000
JUMP TO LOT

Details & Cataloguing

Splendours of the Qing Court

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Hong Kong

A FINELY CARVED ROCK CRYSTAL VASE GROUP AND STAINED IVORY STAND
QING DYNASTY, 18TH CENTURY
carved from a single block of rock crystal with a larger cupped magnolia bloom forming a vessel issuing from a twisted openwork branch with attendant blooms and lingzhi, adjacent to a smaller spherical vase with a small opening, incised on the exterior with wispy clouds and bats, supported on a green stained ivory openwork stand, carved with a pair of birds soaring amidst swirling clouds above crashing waves issuing from a pair of lingzhi on the underside
Quantity: 2
VASE: 19.5CM., 7 5/8 IN.
STAND: 18.5CM., 7 1/4 IN.
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Catalogue Note

The present rock crystal vase is most impressive for its large size and bold carving. It is comparable with a similarly outstanding rock crystal flower container, from the Qing Court collection and still in Beijing, illustrated in The Complete Collection of Treasures of the Palace Museum. Treasures of Imperial Court, Hong Kong, 2004, pl. 23. See also a large glass vessel, made in the Palace Workshop, in the form of  a Buddha's Hand Citron and a pomegranate resting on lingzhi fungus, a design that appears to be closely related to the present vase, illustrated in Zhongguo jingying poli falanqi quanji, vol. 4, Shijiazhuang, 2004, pl. 258.

Rock crystal is first mentioned in Chinese texts of the Wei and Tang dynasties as a product of 'water turned into stone' and 'a beautiful material' imported from Persia. Hence the Chinese name shuijing which can be translated as 'the brilliance of water'. Historically it has been popular with the literati who associated clear crystal with 'plain beauty' and had various scholars objects, such as brushpots, made of this material. However, the majority of large rock chrystal carvings are of the 18th century with pieces made during the Qianlong period most outstanding for their quality of carving. See a large rock crystal brushpot bearing the mark Qianlong yuyong (for Imperial use by the Qianlong emperor), illustrated in Paul Moss, The Literati Mode: Chinese Scholar Paintings, Calligraphy and Desk Objects, London, 1986.

Stands for decorative pieces in the imperial collection were also made in the Palace by artists in the various carving workshops. The skilfully carved ivory stand for this vase not only enhances the beauty of the vessel but is an exquisite ivory carving in its own right.  

 

Splendours of the Qing Court

|
Hong Kong