274
274

PROPERTY FROM A PRIVATE COLLECTION

Timur Novikov
RUSSIAN
SILVER AGE, 1989
Estimate
20,00030,000
LOT SOLD. 25,000 USD
JUMP TO LOT
274

PROPERTY FROM A PRIVATE COLLECTION

Timur Novikov
RUSSIAN
SILVER AGE, 1989
Estimate
20,00030,000
LOT SOLD. 25,000 USD
JUMP TO LOT

Details & Cataloguing

Russian Art

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New York

Timur Novikov
1958-2002
RUSSIAN
SILVER AGE, 1989
signed in Cyrillic and dated 1989 (lower left)

acrylic on textile


45 1/2 by 42 in.
115.5 by 107 cm
Read Condition Report Read Condition Report

Provenance

Acquired directly from the artist by the present owner

Literature

Tatiana Yurieva (ed.), Nash Dar, Saint Petersburg, 2007,  p. 43 illustrated

Catalogue Note

During the mid-1970s, Timur Novikov joined the nonconformist artists' group Letopis' (Chronicles), and became a regular participant in various underground exhibitions. In 1982, together with the artist Ivan Sotnikov, he formed his own group, the New Artists, which collaborated with the Leningrad Rock Club. In the late 1980s, he developed a style that became known as "Neo-Academism."

Textiles are an integral component of many of Novikov's works. He uses fabrics of various patterns and textures, on which he either paints, stencils, or applies collage. The St. Petersburg art critic Victor Mazin has described Novikov's work as "textural minimalism that is related to Kazimir Malevich's Black Square." Stylistically, Novikov's works feature elements similar to those of New Image Painting, the work of an informal grouping of painters in the United States in the late 1970s associated with an expressive figurative style and the resurgence of the medium of painting.

Novikov recalled that after finishing the fourth grade, he moved with his mother to the far north—to the island of Novaya Zemlya in the Arctic Ocean. It was there that the artist "fell in love with the horizontal perspectives, far-off distances, and small objects" so frequently found in his works. The quiet elegance and minimalist nature of his work is also rooted in his belief that the recent technological developments in computerization, the proliferation of mass media through global satellite networks, and the burgeoning number of art magazines have all contributed to an immense overload of visual information. The strength of his works lies in its reductive clarity and accessibility.

Russian Art

|
New York