104
104
Pablo Picasso
BUSTE DE FEMME D'APRES CRANACH LE JEUNE (BLOCH 859; BAER 1053)
Estimate
275,000325,000
LOT SOLD. 657,000 USD
JUMP TO LOT
104
Pablo Picasso
BUSTE DE FEMME D'APRES CRANACH LE JEUNE (BLOCH 859; BAER 1053)
Estimate
275,000325,000
LOT SOLD. 657,000 USD
JUMP TO LOT

Details & Cataloguing

Property from the Raymond and Patsy Nasher Collection

|
New York

Pablo Picasso
1881-1973
BUSTE DE FEMME D'APRES CRANACH LE JEUNE (BLOCH 859; BAER 1053)

linoleum cut printed in colors, the colors fresh and bright, 1958, signed in red crayon, and inscribed 'épreuve d'artiste', a proof aside from the numbered edition of 50, on Arches wove paper, published by Galerie Louise Leiris, with full margins, in good condition (traces of pale mat stain), framed


25 5/8 by 20 15/16 in.; sheet 30 3/16 by 22 7/16 in.
650 by 530 mm; sheet 767 by 570 mm
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Catalogue Note

The verso of the print bears the ink inscription A Madame Patsy Nasher, á l'occasion de l'exposition publique de la très belle collection réunie par elle and par son mari, avec mes sentiments amieux, Louise Leiris.

When Picasso moved to the south of France, he was no longer able to be in close contact with Felix Mourlot, the master printer for his color lithographs whose workshop was in Paris. Finding the creation of lithographs cumbersome, in order to continue creating and producing color prints, and having the need to work without interruption and have absolute control over each work of art, he re-invented the medium of the linoleum cut.  The surface of a linoleum block facilitated rapid cutting of smoothly controlled linear arabesques, and the smooth, non-absorbent surface was well suited to printing bold areas of color.

Portrait de Jeune Fille, d'apres Cranach le Jeune, executed in 1958, was Picasso's first ambitious foray into the complex graphic medium of color linoleum cut.  Multiple blocks were used (and subsequent multiple states, or changes in the cuttings of the blocks) to achieve the intricate pattern and color juxtapositions which make this one of the artist's most important and sought-after prints.  The artistic graphic triumph of this print is achieved by juxtaposing multiple layers of ink on top of each other, creating an almost tactile, luminous surface, which in turn reflects the varying and intricate textures and colors of the splendid 16th century costume. Decorative line combines with almost expressionistic, energetic line to create an image which is as painterly as it is graphic.

Property from the Raymond and Patsy Nasher Collection

|
New York