397
397

PROPERTY FROM A DANISH PRIVATE COLLECTION

Peder Severin Krøyer
Danish 1851-1909
FRU MARIE KRØYER I HAVEN PÅ SKAGEN (MARIE KRØYER IN THE GARDEN AT SKAGEN)
Estimate
170,000220,000
LOT SOLD. 344,800 GBP
JUMP TO LOT
397

PROPERTY FROM A DANISH PRIVATE COLLECTION

Peder Severin Krøyer
Danish 1851-1909
FRU MARIE KRØYER I HAVEN PÅ SKAGEN (MARIE KRØYER IN THE GARDEN AT SKAGEN)
Estimate
170,000220,000
LOT SOLD. 344,800 GBP
JUMP TO LOT

Details & Cataloguing

The Scandinavian Sale

|
London

Peder Severin Krøyer
Danish 1851-1909
FRU MARIE KRØYER I HAVEN PÅ SKAGEN (MARIE KRØYER IN THE GARDEN AT SKAGEN)
signed with initials and dated S K / 22 Juni 92 l.l.
oil on panel
23.7 by 33cm., 9¼ by 13in.
Read Condition Report Read Condition Report

Provenance

Marie Krøyer (née Triepcke), the artist's wife
W. Triepcke (by descent from the above by 1923)
Sale: Bruun Rasmussen, Copenhagen, 9 December 2003, lot 1264
Purchased at the above sale by the present owner

Literature

H. Chr. Christensen, Fortegnelse ove P.S. Krøyers oliemalerier, Copenhagen, 1923, no. 513

Catalogue Note

Acclaimed for having introduced Impressionism to Denmark, Krøyer's skill at rendering light and colour is richly illustrated in this shimmering evocation of the artist's wife Marie gathering flowers in their garden in Skagen. After meeting the beautiful and dreamy Marie Triepcke in Paris in 1889, Marie quickly became Krøyer's model and muse and the couple were married a year later.

Although a pupil of Léon Bonnat in Paris between 1877-9, Krøyer was very aware of the work of the Impressionists and came into contact with Claude Monet, Alfred Sisley and Edgar Degas during his time in France. On his return to Denmark Krøyer visited Skagen on the tip of the Jutland peninsular where his contemporary Michael Ancher was working and attracting a growing community of painters. Thereafter he shared his time between Skagen and Copenhagen. Following a further trip to the Paris in the late 1880s and an exhibition of French paintings in Copenhagen that included works by Monet and Sisley, Krøyer's compositions became fuelled with a new dynamism and use of colour.

After their whirlwind romance, Marie began to feature in all the artist's major works, from private spontaneous moments to larger more studied compositions. Through Marie, Krøyer was able to reflect the special ambience and reverie unique to Skagen, explaining why he returned to her again and again in his paintings.

Bending to pluck a flower, Marie merges with the scenery, her sunhat blending with the yellow of the flowers. Reminiscent of Monet, Krøyer used swift brushstrokes to render his scene, applying enough detail to convey the femininity and activity of the figure but stopping short of describing her features. The present work dating from the early years of their marriage reveals an intimate and serene window into the artist's life.

The Scandinavian Sale

|
London