284
Sapphire and diamond bead necklace, Cartier, circa 1930
Estimate
20,00030,000
LOT SOLD. 133,000 USD (Hammer Price with Buyer's Premium)
JUMP TO LOT
284
Sapphire and diamond bead necklace, Cartier, circa 1930
Estimate
20,00030,000
LOT SOLD. 133,000 USD (Hammer Price with Buyer's Premium)
JUMP TO LOT

Details & Cataloguing

Magnificent Jewels

|
New York

Sapphire and diamond bead necklace, Cartier, circa 1930
The five-strand necklace composed of numerous sapphire beads spaced at intervals by platinum and diamond rondelles, completed by a rectangular-shaped clasp flanked by a pair of double rings set with small round, single-cut and baguette diamonds, the clasp also accented in black enamel, mounted in platinum, length 17 inches, signed Cartier, numbered 2919649.
Read Condition Report Read Condition Report

Provenance

The Estate of Mrs. Francis P. Garvan, Sotheby Parke Bernet Inc., December 5, 1979, lot 62.   

Sotheby's New York, December 10, 1985, lot 211.

Catalogue Note

This neckace was formerly in the Estate of Mrs. Garvan whose husband, Francis Patrick Garvan (1875-1937), was a distinguished lawyer and long-time president of the Chemical Foundation. In 1929, he received the Priestley Medal, the highest honor awarded by the American Chemical Society, and was the only non-scientist to do so. Garvan also established the Society's Francis P. Garvan-John M. Olin Medal in 1936 to "recognize distinguished service to chemistry by women chemists." 

Garvan married Mabel Brady in 1910 and the couple had seven children. Mabel Brady Garvan was involved with the Garvan-Olin Medal for thirty years after her husband's death. In addition to their philanthropy in chemistry, a vast collection of early American arts and crafts known as the Mabel B. Garvan Collection was donated to Yale University which remains one of the most comprehensive in the nation.    

Magnificent Jewels

|
New York