145
145
Yosef Da'at, Joseph ben Issachar Baer, Prague:Gershom ben Bezalel Katz, 1609
Estimate
5,0006,000
LOT SOLD. 8,125 USD
JUMP TO LOT
145
Yosef Da'at, Joseph ben Issachar Baer, Prague:Gershom ben Bezalel Katz, 1609
Estimate
5,0006,000
LOT SOLD. 8,125 USD
JUMP TO LOT

Details & Cataloguing

Judaica

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New York

Yosef Da'at, Joseph ben Issachar Baer, Prague:Gershom ben Bezalel Katz, 1609
150 leaves (6 5/8 x 5 1/2 in.; 170 x 140 mm). Complete as issued with original error in foliation [1-60 (2), 65-152], title and book divisions within woodcut frames, running title flanked by printer's ornaments, numerous illustrations including a double-page illustration between ff. 60 and 65 as well as several full page illustrations; Several leaves laid to size or strengthened at gutter; cropped affecting some text in margins and the outer edges of  full-page illustrations; browned; stained. Modern blind-tooled brown morocco, spine in compartments with gilt titles.
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Provenance

Library of the Jewish community of Berlin (withdrawn)-their stamps on first and last ff.

Literature

Abraham Berliner, Introduction, Rashi al ha-Torah, Frankfurt 1905, p. XIII; Pinchus Krieger, Parshan-Data, Monsey 2005, p. 102; Vinograd, Prague 168.

Catalogue Note

Yosef Da'at is a critical supercommentary on the classical exegesis of  Rashi (Rabbi Solomon ben Isaac of Troyes) on the Pentateuch. The importance of Rashi's commentary cannot be overstated; it is among the most frequently printed Hebrew texts and an edition of his commentary was in fact the earliest dated Hebrew book ever printed (Reggio de Calabria: 1475). Making use of a late thirteenth century manuscript, Joseph ben Issachar Baer sought to rectify the errors that had crept into the numerous editions of Rashi printed since the fifteenth century. Joseph also included more than a dozen illustrations based on drawings in the manuscript that serve to help elucidate Rashi's text.  This project reflects a growing awareness of the shortcomings of printed books, and a desire to correct the transmitted text based on rational methods. Printers of later editions of Rashi have incorporated many of Joseph's corrections without mentioning him by name.

Judaica

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New York