147
147
A rare pair of Swedish painted terracotta faux gilt-bronze and bronze neo-classical vases and covers
first quarter 19th century
Estimate
15,00020,000
JUMP TO LOT
147
A rare pair of Swedish painted terracotta faux gilt-bronze and bronze neo-classical vases and covers
first quarter 19th century
Estimate
15,00020,000
JUMP TO LOT

Details & Cataloguing

Important Continental Furniture

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London

A rare pair of Swedish painted terracotta faux gilt-bronze and bronze neo-classical vases and covers
first quarter 19th century
each of ovoid form, the shallow inverted bell-shaped cover with a detachable flaming finial, the bodies with a band of paterae with three fluted cornucopiae with detachable flaming finials terminating in paw feet, the underside with a band of leaves, on a faux marble Spanish portor concave-sided triform base
each 62cm high, 50cm wide; plinths : 12cm high; 2 ft. ½ in., 1 ft. 7¾ in., 4¾ in.
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Catalogue Note

Literature:
Hakan Groth, Neoclassicism in the North, Swedish Furniture and Interiors 1770-1850, London, 1990, p. 174, illustrated plate 167 in the Salon at Skottorp, Sweden.

These vases reflect the Swedish early 19th century taste for combining bronze and gilt-bronze which in this rare pair of vases is executed in terracotta. They are based upon French models and are very much in the goût grec style.

Skottorp has some of the best Empire interiors in Sweden  but the house itself dates from the late 17th century. It was built for the Royal Secretary Frans Joel Örnestedt (d. 1685) by Nicodemus Tessin the Elder based upon Vaux-le-Vicomte in France. When it was purchased by the Commercial Councillor Peter Möller (d. 1831) he commissioned Carl Fredrik Sundvall to remodel it completely which he undertook from 1816-28. 

All the elements in the Salon were designed by Sundvall, who was inspired by Italy in the late 18th century. He also worked for the Swedish King and the Salon at Skottorp is according to Groth ` probably the grandest Empire room to be found in any private house in Sweden'.

Carl Fredrik Sundvall (1754-1831):

He was one of the most outstanding Swedish Neo-classical architects in the late 18th century and became Court Intendant in 1792. He studied in France in 1783, Italy in 1788 and England in 1791 and returned to Sweden in 1792. Sundvall decorated the Royal Museum (1792-94) and designed vases for the Alvdalen porphyry works (1788-90).

 

Important Continental Furniture

|
London