14
14

PROPERTY FROM A PRIVATE COLLECTION

Jacob Isaacksz. van Ruisdael
Haarlem 1628/9 - 1682 Amsterdam
HILLY LANDSCAPE WITH STOOKS OF WHEAT
Estimate
600,000800,000
LOT SOLD. 632,000 USD
JUMP TO LOT
14

PROPERTY FROM A PRIVATE COLLECTION

Jacob Isaacksz. van Ruisdael
Haarlem 1628/9 - 1682 Amsterdam
HILLY LANDSCAPE WITH STOOKS OF WHEAT
Estimate
600,000800,000
LOT SOLD. 632,000 USD
JUMP TO LOT

Details & Cataloguing

Important Old Master Paintings

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Jacob Isaacksz. van Ruisdael
Haarlem 1628/9 - 1682 Amsterdam
HAARLEM 1628/9 - 1682 AMSTERDAM
HILLY LANDSCAPE WITH STOOKS OF WHEAT
signed in monogram lower right: JvR
oil on canvas
25 3/4 by 31 ins.; 65.5 by 78.5 cm.
Read Condition Report Read Condition Report

Provenance

Possibly Henry Clinton, 2nd Duke of Newcastle, Clumber Park;
Henry, 4th Duke of Newcastle, Clumber Park, Worksop, Nottinghamshire, by 1835;
By descent at Clumber to Henry, 7th Duke of Newcastle:
By inheritance with Clumber and its contents to The Earl of Lincoln;
His sale, London, Christie's, 4 June 1937, lot 94, for 1,260 Guineas to Paul Cassirer;
K.A. Volz, The Hague, by 1938;
By inheritance to Ch. R. Volz, The Hague, by 1964;
Thence by descent until sold anonymously ("The Property of a Gentleman"), Sotheby's, 9 March 1983, lot 96, for £95,000 to French and Co.;
Anonymous sale, New York, Sotheby's, 17 January 1985, lot 92, unsold;
Private collection, Germany.

Exhibited

Manchester, (Art Treasures), 1857, no. 1023 (lent by The Duke of Newcastle);
London, British Institution, 1866, no. 30 (lent by The Duke of Newcastle;
London, Royal Academy, Winter Exhibition, 1879, no. 118 (lent by The Duke of Newcastle;
Rotterdam, Museum Boymans, Meesterwerken uit vier eeuwen (1400-1800).  Tentoonstelling van schilderijen en teekeningen uit particuliere verzamelingen in Nederland, 25 June - 15 October 1938, no. 131,  (lent by K.A. Volz);
London, Victoria and Albert Museum, The Orange and the Rose, 22 October - 13 December 1964, no. 64, (lent by Ch. R. Volz);
Würzburg, Heide Hübner, Summer 1993, p. 30 in her catalogue. 

Literature

J. Smith, A Catalogue Raisonné..., vol. VI, London 1835, p. 101, no. 321;
G. Waagen, Galleries and Cabinets of Art in Great Britain, vol. IV, London 1857, p. 509 ("An excellent and careful picture of his earlier time");
C. Hofstede de Groot, A Catalogue Raisonné..., vol IV, London 1912, p. 41, no. 110;
A. Graves, A Century of Loan Exhibitions, vol. III, London 1914, pp. 1180-1, 1183;
J. Rosenberg, Jacob van Ruisdael, Berlin 1928, p. 77, no. 77;
S. Slive, Jacob van Ruisdael.  A Complete Catalogue of His Paintings, Drawings and Etchings, New Haven & London 2001, p. 116, no. 88, reproduced in colour, and p. 511, under no. D23.

Catalogue Note

"A landscape, represented under the aspect of a fine summer's day, and during harvest time.  this excellent picture is chiefly composed of a large sloping field, covered with sheaves of wheat, over a portion of which, and the adjacent meadow, glides the shade of a passing cloud".  Thus did John Smith, based on another's account, describe this picture, which then hung in the Breakfast Room of the Duke of Newcastle's seat at Clumber Park in Nottinghamshire. 

This is a work of Ruisdael's early maturity, dated by Seymour Slive circa 1655.  The half-timbered house and the steep hill with out-crops of rock rising from a flat landscape recall the topography of Bentheim and environs, and appear to be inspired by Ruisdael's visit to that region, probably at the beginning of that decade.  No topographically identifiable drawings made by Ruisdael on his Bentheim journey survive, but the present work is clearly based in part on a drawing in Berlin, Staatliche Museen Preussischer Kulturbesitz, Kupferstichkabinett (see Fig. 1) (no. 3129; see Slive under Literature, p. 511, no. D23, reproduced).  Slive dates the drawing to the same time as the painting, however, so that like the present painting partly based on it, it is probably a reminiscence of Bentheim, not a record made at the time.

This picture is recorded in the Breakfast Room at Clumber Park whenin the possession of the 4th Duke of Newcastle in 1835.  It is not known whether he or one of his forbears acquired it, but it may well have been his grandfather, Henry Clinton, 2nd Duke of Newcastle, who built Clumber (see Fig. 2) in the 2nd half of the 18th Century, and who amassed much of the picture collection. 

A copy by a weaker hand is in the Philadelphia Museum of Art. 

Important Old Master Paintings

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New York