215
Kees van Dongen
FEMME À LA TOILETTE
Schätzung
400.000600.000
Los Verkauft 461,000 USD (Hammerpreis mit Käuferprovision)
ZU LOS SPRINGEN
215
Kees van Dongen
FEMME À LA TOILETTE
Schätzung
400.000600.000
Los Verkauft 461,000 USD (Hammerpreis mit Käuferprovision)
ZU LOS SPRINGEN

Impressionist & Modern Art Day Sale

|
New York

Kees van Dongen
1877 - 1968
FEMME À LA TOILETTE
Signed van Dongen (upper left)
Oil on canvas
25 3/8 by 19 3/4 in.
64.6 by 50 cm.
Zustandsbericht lesen Zustandsbericht lesen

This work will be included in the forthcoming catalogue raisonné being prepared by Jacques Chalom des Cordes under the sponsorship of the Wildenstein Institute.

Provenienz

Galerie Kahnweiler, Paris
Private Collection (and sold: Christie's, New York, May 13, 1998, lot 368)
Private Collection, Connecticut (acquired at the above sale and sold: Sotheby's, New York, May 6, 2010, lot 347)
Acquired at the above sale by the present owner

Ausgestellt

Paris, Musée de Montmartre & Takasaki, Musée Municipal, Montmartre et les peintres, 1994

Literatur

Espirit Montmarte. Die Boheme in Paris um 1900 (exhibition catalogue), Schirn Kunsthalle, Frankfurt, 2014, illustrated in color p. 118

Katalognotizen

Executed shortly after van Dongen's first exhibition with the Fauves at the Salon d'Automne, the energetic Femme à la toilette is a superb example of the artist's striking female portraits from his early career. Unlike the other Fauve painters such as Matisse and Derain, who depicted the sunlit coast of southern France, van Dongen found particular inspiration in city life. It was Parisian nightlife and the artificial lights of the circus and the concert halls, rather than nature and open spaces, that excited him.

In the present work, the woman's dramatic black stockings and hat are typical of the artist's Fauve portraits, in which his subjects are often conveyed with vibrant intensity. The artist was fascinated by costumes and ornaments, and often his female figures are embellished with oversized hats. In the present work, the hat and dressing table suggest that this sitter might be a member of high society, rather than a cabaret performer. The figure's identity remains obscure however, as van Dongen's primary interest lies in the feminine allure of her figure. The subtlety of the woman's pale skin and white slip are accentuated by her black hat, stockings, and vibrant blue outline. The green strokes highlighting her shoulder and arm demonstrate the artist's disregard for naturalistic representation, in favor of expressing the physicality and sensual presence of his sitter.

Impressionist & Modern Art Day Sale

|
New York