97
97

PROPERTY SOLD FOR THE BENEFIT OF A CHARITABLE FOUNDATION

A West Persian silk rug, possibly Joshugan
ZU LOS SPRINGEN
97

PROPERTY SOLD FOR THE BENEFIT OF A CHARITABLE FOUNDATION

A West Persian silk rug, possibly Joshugan
ZU LOS SPRINGEN

Rugs & Carpets

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A West Persian silk rug, possibly Joshugan
Knot density: V: 11/cm; H: 14/cm
approximately 173 by 146cm; 5ft. 8in., 4ft. 10in.
early 19th century
Zustandsbericht lesen Zustandsbericht lesen

Provenienz

Christie’s New York, September 20, 1979

Robert Khan

Eberhart Herrmann (by 1982)

An anonymous German Collector

Sold by the estate of the above to benefit a Charitable Foundation

Literatur

Herrmann, Eberhart, Seltene Orientteppiche (Rare Oriental Carpets), Munich, Vol. IV, Cat. No. 68, pp.198-199.

Christie’s New York, September 20, 1979, catalogued as Heriz (sold for the then record price of $44,000)

Art & Auction, December 1982/January 1983, front cover and Benedict, p. 61, Rosaline Candlin and Howard, Constance, ‘A Nineteenth-Century Persian Rug’

Katalognotizen

For a similar and equally evocative example in scale and design, with overall repeat pattern leaf lattice enclosing flowering plants, centred with a similarly distinctive central motif superimposed on the diagonal lattice, with diminutive chequered spandrels, and ivory ground border, Northwest Persia, 19th century, see Herrmann, Eberhart, Von Konya bis Kokand, Seltene Orientteppiche (Rare Oriental Carpets), Munich, 1980, Vol. III, Cat. No. 40, p.86.

Herrmann, in attributing this published carpet to Joshugan, acknowledged it as being a puzzle. The design broadly relates to the large group of Safavid inspired designs from the 16th through to the 18th century which included the garden and the shrub lattice designs. The present example is particularly unusual and charming with the pomegranates at each cross-over of the lattice leaf lattice, and the border with alternating cypress tree and foliate motifs, with the appealing inclusion of small facing birds. These designs migrated to the central and northwest areas of Persia, and were taken up by the independent weavers of Joshugan and Kurdistan. Herrmann notes that the present carpet resembles an example in the Tehran Museum, described as Baktiari, but not of Baktiari technical structure; along with the comparable example cited above, which is of the same structure, it is possible they all belong to the same group.

Please note that there may be restrictions on the import of property of Iranian origin into some or all member countries of the Gulf Co-Operation Council.  Any buyers planning to import property of Iranian origin into any of these countries should satisfy themselves of the relevant import regime. Sotheby's will not assist buyers with the shipment of such items into countries of the Gulf Co-Operation Council.

Addendum: In addition to the examples cited above, the article in Art & Auction op.cit notes two further rugs that might ‘ultimately receive a Joshuqan provenance’: Sotheby’s New York April 10 & 11, 1981, lot 424, with yellow ground with plant trellis, similar spandrels to the present lot,  6ft 2 in by 4 ft 9 in, sold for $47,000 (excluding Buyers’ Premium, then 10%) and Sotheby’s New York, December 16, 1978, lot 82 (described as a Tabriz), again with similar spandrels.  Another example is also noted, present whereabouts unknown, which apparently has an identical border and was sold by Parke-Bernet Galleries in March, 1938 from the Estate of Mr and Mrs Percy Rockefeller (for $350).

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