3218
3218
A RARE GILT-BRONZE STANDING FIGURE OF AVALOKITESVARA
TANG DYNASTY
Schätzung
400.000600.000
Los Verkauft 7,880,000 HKD (Hammerpreis mit Käuferprovision)
ZU LOS SPRINGEN
3218
A RARE GILT-BRONZE STANDING FIGURE OF AVALOKITESVARA
TANG DYNASTY
Schätzung
400.000600.000
Los Verkauft 7,880,000 HKD (Hammerpreis mit Käuferprovision)
ZU LOS SPRINGEN

Chinese Art through the Eye of Sakamoto Gorō: Early Buddhist Bronzes

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Hongkong

A RARE GILT-BRONZE STANDING FIGURE OF AVALOKITESVARA
TANG DYNASTY
cast standing in abhanga with the hip slightly thrust to the left on an octagonal double-lotus base, the sensual figure rendered holding a handscroll, possibly a sutra text, in the left hand, clad in a dhoti with the upper body left bare and adorned with long loops of beaded jewellery draping over the body, further flanked by long cascading scarves, the face depicted serene and tilted downward, flanked by a pair of long pendulous earlobes, all below a neat pyramidal arrangement of ten small heads, the reverse of the head with a loop for the attachment of a mandorla
18.4 cm, 7 1/4  in.
Zustandsbericht lesen Zustandsbericht lesen

Provenienz

Collection of Sato Gengen (1888-1963).

Katalognotizen

The slim features and elegantly curved posture of this bodhisattva are representative of the Tang dynasty artistic style, during which the Chinese sculptural tradition in all its major mediums reached a stage of blossom. The curving form of the deity’s torso achieves an almost dancelike movement. This highly recognisable stylistic element of the swayed-hip posture became especially popular during the reign of Emperor Xuanzong (712-756), when sculptures in general became more graceful in design. Compare for example a larger Tang figure standing on an elaborate lotus base in the Asian Art Museum of San Francisco, illustrated in Chinese Art in Overseas Collections. Buddhist Sculpture, vol. II, Taipei, 1990, pl. 119. 

It is rare to find Tang bronze sculptures executed with such elaborate details and so well preserved. Due to their fragility, the scrolling decorations around the figures rarely survive or survive only partially, such as a figure sold in our New York rooms, 22nd September 2004, lot 7.

For a comparable bronze figure of Avalokitesvara with slight variations in the design in the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, see Chinese Art in Overseas Collections, op. cit., pl. 117, illustrated alongside a smaller example cast with a similar scrolling base, in the Asian Art Museum of San Francisco, pl. 118; and a figure in the National Palace Museum, Taipei, included in the exhibition Recently Acquired Gilt-Bronze Buddhist Images, Taipei, 1996, cat. no. 8.

Chinese Art through the Eye of Sakamoto Gorō: Early Buddhist Bronzes

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Hongkong