328
328

PROPERTY FROM A PRIVATE COLLECTION

Claude Monet
LE GOLFE JUAN
Schätzung
600.000800.000
Los Verkauft 1,330,000 USD (Hammerpreis mit Käuferprovision)
ZU LOS SPRINGEN
328

PROPERTY FROM A PRIVATE COLLECTION

Claude Monet
LE GOLFE JUAN
Schätzung
600.000800.000
Los Verkauft 1,330,000 USD (Hammerpreis mit Käuferprovision)
ZU LOS SPRINGEN

Impressionist & Modern Art Day Sale

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New York

Claude Monet
1840 - 1926
LE GOLFE JUAN
Stamped with the signature Claude Monet (lower left)
Oil on canvas
25 5/8 by 36 1/4 in.
65 by 92 cm
Painted at Cap d'Antibes in 1888.
Zustandsbericht lesen Zustandsbericht lesen

Provenienz

Michel Monet, Giverny
Stephen Hahn, New York (acquired circa 1968)
Galerie Beyeler, Basel (acquired circa 1971)
Sale: Sotheby Parke-Bernet, New York, May 21, 1981, lot 522
Noortman & Brod (acquired circa 1983)
Sale: Sotheby's, London, March 31, 1987, lot 18
Aska International, Tokyo (acquired in 1989)
Private Collection, Japan

Literatur

Daniel Wildenstein, Monet, Vie et oeuvre, vol. V, Paris & Lausanne, 1991, no. 1180, illustrated p. 46
Daniel Wildenstein, Monet, Catalogue raisonné, vol. III, Cologne, 1996, no. 1180, illustrated in color p. 447

Katalognotizen

Painted in Antibes, Le Golf Juan is exemplary of the great Impressionist aim to capture the overall atmosphere of a fleeting moment—with all the nuances and fluctuations of weather and light—rather than focusing on the detail that comes with naturalistic representation. It is an exquisite rendering of a blustery seascape with snow-capped mountains and craggy rocks framing the boisterous sea. By positioning the rocks close to the picture plane, Monet situates the viewer in the heart of the action. The energetic, spontaneous brushwork echoes the vitality of the scene itself and this is complemented by the beautifully delicate pastel-toned palette, a delightful swirl of pale pinks, blues and whites, punctuated by accents of darker color to add weight to certain areas. The paint surface is undeniably rich and the handling of the medium confident: this is a work that was clearly painted in a frenzy of inspiration.

It was at the suggestion of the art dealer Paul Durand-Ruel that Monet first visited Antibes on the Mediterranean Sea, where the present work was executed and where the artist based himself from January to April of 1888. During the 1880s Monet increasingly explored regions outside Paris and Normandy in search of new artistic inspiration. Sometimes these ventures into new territory were accompanied by doubts and challenges, as in the south, where the brilliant sun was initially difficult for Monet. He wrote to his companion and future wife, Alice Hoschedé, from Antibes: "How beautiful it is here, to be sure, but how difficult to paint! I can see what I want to do quite clearly but I'm not there yet. It's so clear and pure in its pinks and blues that the slightest misjudged stroke looks like a smear of dirt" (quoted in Jennifer A. Thompson, Masterpieces from the Philadelphia Museum of Art: Impressionism and Modern Art, 2007, p. 72). Despite any misgivings Monet initially may have had about his ability to depict Mediterranean light, it is clear that he meticulously worked through these compositions until he was satisfied with the result. In June 1888 the dealer Theo van Gogh, Vincent's brother, acquired and exhibited ten paintings that Monet had painted at Antibes, a true testament to the success of this series of works.

Impressionist & Modern Art Day Sale

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New York