110
110
Anish Kapoor
UNTITLED
ZU LOS SPRINGEN
110
Anish Kapoor
UNTITLED
ZU LOS SPRINGEN

Contemporary Art Day Auction

|
London

Anish Kapoor
B.1954
UNTITLED
fiberglass and paint
90 by 90 by 46.5cm.; 35 1/2 by 35 1/2 by 18 3/8 in.
Executed in 2013.
Zustandsbericht lesen Zustandsbericht lesen

Provenienz

Lisson Gallery, London
Acquired directly from the above by the present owner in 2013

Katalognotizen

“Space is not voids. Space is a material. It is physical.”
Anish Kapoor quoted in: David Ansham, Anish Kapoor, London and New York 2009, p. 404

An exquisite example of Anish Kapoor’s ongoing investigation into the possibilities of spatial manipulation, Untitled forms part of the artist’s seminal series of wall-mounted sculptures. Executed in a vibrant blue that is contrasted by the clean white exterior of the sculpture, it perfectly captures the artist’s interest in the immaterial spatial effects that are created by the extraordinary surfaces of his sculptures: whether it is highly polished steel, pure pigment or the translucent surface of alabaster, Kapoor’s sculptures transcend their material qualities. In the artist’s own works: “when it is really perfect enough something happens - it literally ceases to be physical; it levitates; it does something else what happens especially with concave surfaces" (Anish Kapoor quoted in: Exhibition Catalogue, Boston, Institute of Contemporary Art, Anish Kapoor, 2008, p. 53).
Kapoor’s distinguished oeuvre is in many ways rooted in the traditions of minimalist sculpture, characterised by a persistent interest in the phenomenology of sculpture that also informed the work of Donald Judd and Carl Andre. Like his predecessors, Kapoor’s work addresses the very experience of perception itself, creating an awareness and consciousness of seeing and experiencing sculpture through the extraordinary visual and material manifestations of his work. Ultimately Kapoor’s sculptures transcend their physicality, creating an immaterial space that invokes the sublime. “The spatial questions it seemed to ask were not about deep space but about present space, which I began to think about as a new sublime.  If the traditional sublime is in deep space, then this is proposing that the contemporary sublime is in front of the picture plane, not beyond it.  I continue to make these works because I feel this is a whole new spatial adventure” (Anish Kapoor quoted in: Ibid. p. 52).

Contemporary Art Day Auction

|
London