88
88
Alexandre Noll
CABINET
Schätzung
150.000250.000
Los Verkauft 425,000 USD (Hammerpreis mit Käuferprovision)
ZU LOS SPRINGEN
88
Alexandre Noll
CABINET
Schätzung
150.000250.000
Los Verkauft 425,000 USD (Hammerpreis mit Käuferprovision)
ZU LOS SPRINGEN

The Jon Stryker Collection: Masterworks of European Modernism

|
New York

Alexandre Noll
CABINET
together with a sketch of the present lot
mahogany
35 7/8  x 52 1/2  x 24 1/2  in. (91.1 x 133.4 x 62.2 cm)
1943
Zustandsbericht lesen Zustandsbericht lesen

Provenienz

Private Collection, France
Jacques Lacoste, Paris
Galerie Patrick Seguin, Paris
DeLorenzo 1950, New York, 2005

Literatur

Image de France, La Revue des Métiers d'Art, July 1943, p. 6
Roberto Aloi, L'Arredamento Moderno 1945, Terza Serie,  Milan, 1945, n.p.
Olivier Jean-Elie and Pierre Passebon, Alexandre Noll, Paris, 1999, p. 27 (for realted examples)

Katalognotizen

Nothing seemed to predestine Alexandre Noll to art. Born in Alsace, in the East of France, in 1890, he started working as a bank employee. However, during the First World War, he was sent to Salonique, where he discovered wood engraving. Back in Paris, he decided to develop this technique, which was rapidly taken over by sculpture. Besides the umbrella handles he made for the Bon Marché, he was working on his own decorative objects and sculptures that were exhibited at Paris Salons from 1921 to 1942. His first pieces of furniture are presented in 1943, at the Compagnie des Arts Français.

Noll used wood as his only media and mean of expression, using it for his elementary power and discovering all its virtues, charms, beauties and reactions, through his sculpted works and experimentations. He used to say: “I don’t kill the wood, I obey it”.  Following the nature and nuances of the exotic or rustic wood, each of his works was directly inspired by nature, authentic and unique. He treated wood with passion and respect and refused to “inflict the eternal wound of iron”: his pieces of furniture were made without any hinge or nail and convey an impression of primitive force and timeless beauty. Noll’s organic forms blur the line between sculpture and furniture.

Through his instinctive approach, Noll created a new language, made of abstract forms, solid volumes and powerfully rounded shapes, looking for answers in the wood “that seemed to contain some lost secret for him.”

The Jon Stryker Collection: Masterworks of European Modernism

|
New York