4
4
Alfred Stieglitz
EVENING, NEW YORK FROM THE SHELTON
Schätzung
200.000300.000
Los Verkauft 929,000 USD (Hammerpreis mit Käuferprovision)
ZU LOS SPRINGEN
4
Alfred Stieglitz
EVENING, NEW YORK FROM THE SHELTON
Schätzung
200.000300.000
Los Verkauft 929,000 USD (Hammerpreis mit Käuferprovision)
ZU LOS SPRINGEN

175 Masterworks To Celebrate 175 Years Of Photography: Property from Joy of Giving Something Foundation

|
New York

Alfred Stieglitz
1864-1946
EVENING, NEW YORK FROM THE SHELTON
flush-mounted, mounted again to board, framed, 1931
9 5/8  by 7 1/2  in. (24.4 by 19 cm.)
Zustandsbericht lesen Zustandsbericht lesen

Provenienz

Doris Bry, New York, 1994

Literatur

Greenough 1388

Waldo Frank, et al., America & Alfred Stieglitz: A Collective Portrait (New York, 1934), pl. 32d

Bonnie Yochelson, Alfred Stieglitz: New York (New York, 2010),  p. 77

Dorothy Norman, Alfred Stieglitz: An American Seer (New York, 1960), pl. LXVIII

In Focus: Alfred Stieglitz (J. Paul Getty Museum, 1995), pl. 42

Katalognotizen

Evening, New York from the Shelton, is one of a series of images of mid-town Manhattan that Stieglitz began in 1927 and continued into the 1930s.  Taken from the windows of his apartment in the Shelton Hotel, or from his Intimate Gallery and later, An American Place, the photographs record the buildings at different times of day and evening, and the changing skyline.  These beautiful, meditative photographs are one of Stieglitz’s last great bodies of work. 

In Alfred Stieglitz: The Key Set, Sarah Greenough locates prints of the image offered here in the following institutions: the National Gallery of Art; The Museum of Modern Art; the J. Paul Getty Museum; the Princeton University Art Museum; The Philadelphia Museum of Art (two prints); and the National Museum of Modern Art, Tokyo.  

“So rapidly are tall, and ever taller, buildings springing up in the metropolitan centers of the United States today that the twenty-story skyscrapers which impressed the European visitor in 1910 have either been demolished or else completely overshadowed in American architecture’s skyward race.  Each month sees an old landmark tumbled into ruins and in its place a lean steel skeleton ascending toward new heights.”

Harvey Wiley Corbett, America Builds Skyward, 1932

175 Masterworks To Celebrate 175 Years Of Photography: Property from Joy of Giving Something Foundation

|
New York