324
324

PROPERTY FROM THE COLLECTION OF ROBERT M. EDSEL

Jacques Stella
JUDITH WITH THE HEAD OF HOLOFERNES
Estimate
15,00020,000
LOT SOLD. 31,250 USD
JUMP TO LOT
324

PROPERTY FROM THE COLLECTION OF ROBERT M. EDSEL

Jacques Stella
JUDITH WITH THE HEAD OF HOLOFERNES
Estimate
15,00020,000
LOT SOLD. 31,250 USD
JUMP TO LOT

Details & Cataloguing

Master Paintings and Sculpture: Part II

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New York

Jacques Stella
LYON 1596 - 1657 PARIS
JUDITH WITH THE HEAD OF HOLOFERNES

Provenance

Anonymous sale, London, Christie's, 7 April 1995, lot 49 (as by Jacopo Ligozzi);
With Rafael Valls, London;
With Danny Katz, London;
From whom purchased by a private collector;
By whom sold ("Property from a Distinguished Private Collection"), New York, Sotheby's, 28 January 2005, lot 274 (as by Jacopo Ligozzi);
There purchased by the present owner. 

Exhibited

Fort Worth, Kimbell Art Museum, From the Private Collections of Texas, 22 November 2009 - 21 March 2010, no. 19

Literature

S. Laveissière, Jacques Stella, exhibition catalogue, Lyon 2006, p. 98;
R. Brettell and C.D. Dickerson, From the Private Collections of Texas, exhibition catalogue, Fort Worth 2009, pp. 148-150, cat. no 19, reproduced.

Catalogue Note

When this painting was first offered for sale in 1995 (see Provenance), Terence Mullaly attributed the work to Ligozzi, suggesting a date early in the artist's career, before 1577, when Ligozzi left Verona for Florence. In 2006, however, Sylvain Laveissière suggested the work to be by the hand of Jacques Stella and, in 2009, C.D. Dickerson published the painting as conclusively by Stella (see Exhibited and Literature), further developing Laveissière’s ideas. He points towards the striking similarity of both the costumes and facial features seen here to those found in other Stella compositions and also observes that Stella painted many small works on slate while living in Rome in the early 17th century. Stella's decision to depict Judith not only after the act of violence in which she slays Holofernes, but also with such a serene expression, is a noticeable departure from Caravaggio's influential approach to this subject and exemplifies Stella's commitment to portray non-traditional subject matter. 

Master Paintings and Sculpture: Part II

|
New York