193
193

PROPERTY FROM THE COLLECTION OF A FRENCH CONNOISSEUR

Henri Hayden
NATURE MORTE 
Estimate
400,000600,000
JUMP TO LOT
193

PROPERTY FROM THE COLLECTION OF A FRENCH CONNOISSEUR

Henri Hayden
NATURE MORTE 
Estimate
400,000600,000
JUMP TO LOT

Details & Cataloguing

Impressionist & Modern Art Day Sale

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New York

Henri Hayden
1883 - 1970
NATURE MORTE 
Signed Hayden and dated 1918 (lower left); signed Hayden and dated II-1918 (on the reverse)
Oil on canvas
31 3/4 by 25 3/4 in.
80.7 by 65.3 cm
Painted in February 1918.
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The authenticity of this work has been confirmed by Pierre Célice.

Provenance

Sale: Christie's, London, May 24, 1990, lot 144
Private Collection (acquired at the above sale and sold: Sotheby's, Paris, June 3, 2010, lot 79)
Acquired at the above sale

Catalogue Note

This delightful still-life composition from 1918 illustrates the Cubist virtuosity and manifest talent as a colorist for which Henri Hayden would become famous.

Born in Warsaw, Hayden first studied engineering before devoting himself entirely to painting. In 1907 he moved to Paris where he studied briefly at the Académie de La Palette, a hub of the avant-garde whose future instructors would include Henri Le Fauconnier and Jean Metzinger. Hayden became increasingly interested in the work of Cézanne and in 1915 moved to a studio on the Boulevard Raspail on the Left Bank, near Metzinger, Severini and Picasso. He began to rub shoulders with the artists of the Montparnasse group including Gris, Lipchitz, Jacob, Matisse and Cocteau. Before long, carried along by the spirit of emulation that pervaded Montparnasse, Hayden had converted to Cubism with what Salmon would describe as "a considered enthusiasm, dissociating color from form and reducing objects to elliptical signs. Hayden adhered to Cubism, having already produced a great deal, in order to acquire a great deal of himself" (quoted in Anisabelle Berès & Michel Arveiller, Au temps des cubistes 1910- 1920, Paris, 2006, p. 252).

The artist himself would declare several years later: "I only absorbed Cubism in 1915, after having swallowed and digested all of French painting in a few years. This rapid absorption led me, in a spirit of creative synthesis, without even realising, to Picasso and Braque's experimentation at the time" (quoted in ibid., p. 252).

In this elegantly accomplished still life, Hayden demonstrates a veritable flare for surface handling, trompe l'oeil effects and inventive lines: the surface of the painting is dextrously divided into juxtaposed, contrasting textures, forms and colors that transform the everyday subject matter into a vibrant hymn to painting itself.

Impressionist & Modern Art Day Sale

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New York